10 types of exquisite Tea around the world!

A wise girl once said, tea transcends boundaries! Its not important who that girl is but ain’t she right? No matter which corner of the world you are, you will get a person or two to join and celebrate an indigenous tea affair . We already know our perfect cup of tea i.e a karak doodh patti malai maar k! But what type of tea is prepared and served throughout the world? Let’s have a look!

Japanense Matcha

This powdered green tea uses finely ground green tea leaves. The traditional tea ceremonies in Japan are centred on the preparation and serving of Matcha which is packed with anti-oxidants. This reflects the long standing love for tea in the Japanese culture.

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Photo: japanesematchapowder

Tibetan Po Cha

This butter tea known as Po Cha is made of salt, yak butter and tea leaves. It’s brewed for a few hours to achieve a bitter taste which is then churned with salt and butter directly before serving. Here is the recipe if you want to please your taste buds with Po cha!

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Photo: deliceboreal.com

Turkish Cay tea

You must have known Turkey for the famous Turkish coffee, but Cay tea is equally popular. It is not only served after every meal but also often in between them. Cay can be served with or without sugar but always without milk. The interesting two chamber brewing pot for this tea makes Cay specially unique!

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Photo: Senas Sagr

Thailand’s Cha Yen

Chan Yen is Thailand’s version of iced milk tea as it combines brewed Thai tea mix and condensed milk. Sounds like an inviting delight to creamy-tea lovers!

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Photo: Sherry from Thai Foodie

Chinese Pu’er tea

Chinese are fond of different rich and malty flavours of tea just because they love it! Pu’er is a combination of a variety of aged dark, fermented tea produced in Yunnan province.  Despite using the same source plant, different processes are used to make various Pu’er teas. For example, the yellow leaf of Pu’er is packaged in balls, crumbled into the cup and steeped in hot water, thus producing a cup of strong, toasty tea!

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Photo: servingjoy

Egyptian Karkady or Hibiscus Tea

Egyptians commonly drink unsweetened black tea throughout the day, but Hibiscus iced tea or Karkady is most popular especially at the weddings. This cranberry-like flavoured tea follows a really simple recipe, check here!

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Photo: amelioretasante.com

Mongolia Suutei tsai

Let’s call it a sugary, creamy cup of deliciousness which tastes like milky, sweet cereal. The traditional Mongolian Suutei Tsai is mostly drunk throughout the day and at meals. Infact, Mongolians take pride in serving it to their guests and this gesture is known as Ger or Yurt.

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Photo: globaltableadventure.com

South African Red Tea

This caffeine free red tea extracted from Rooibos plant is found exclusively in South Africa. The tea has a naturally mild and sweet flavour so it is served without sugar and milk.

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Photo: rooibosredtea.com

Malaysian Teh tarik

This one is closer to our Pakistani version of Doodh patti, only it uses sweetened creamer over unsweetened milk! Teh Terik which means “pull” refers to the pouring process during tea preparation. Malaysians like having it after a meal or as a mid day treat!

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Photo: AiPing from curiousnut.com

Argentinan Yerba mate

This is an important beverage of Argentinean tea culture. This Smokey flavoured tea is served in a hollow gourd and drunk through a metal straw known as Bombilla. Yerba mate is dried over fire and steeped in hot water to be served either cold or briskly hot!

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Photo: culture.oasiscollections.com

It is interesting to know how a simple cup of tea communicates aesthetic and taste of a culture. Whether you are a casual tea sipper or the person whose survival solely depends on it, no one else knows the Beau-Tea of tea more than you! So how do you like your tea?

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